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20121014
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and control over strategically important technology. speaking in brussels, the german defense minister refused to accept any blame for the failure of the merger. >> this was a commercial decision made after many discussions. we have stated our opinion, and i have no further comments to make on that. >> from a business point of view, the deal made sense. the merger would have created the biggest company in the defense industry. combined, the firms would have employed more than 200,000 people and generated revenue of 38.5 billion euros, and it would have overtaken their american competitors -- lockheed martin and boeing. bae systems has a strong presence in the american market, whereas eads has never been as successful. for that reason, this could have been a missed opporunity. >> i would like to draw in our political correspondent. simon, there was suggestion the deal collapsed because of german objections. what was it the germans were not happy about? >> it seems that germany, like france, was unwilling to give up state influence over this important defense company, which is what bae systems w
-how, technologies and human resources. through that, we want to contribute to international society. >> reporter: world bank representatives say more money is spent on disaster response and recovery than preparation and prevention. they note that the impact of disasters, especially on the poor, is growing. they argue, investing in risk management could help reverse this trend, saving lives and money. takefumi terui, nhk world, sendai. >>> one of the lasting legacies of japan's earthquake and tsunami has been the crisis at fukushima daiichi. the accident at the nuclear plant prompted japanese leaders to hold off on restarting reactors. they've only allowed two to go back online in a year and a half. that's caused imports of liquefied natural gas to rise, driving up the cost of generating power. japanese officials are now working with their counterparts in india to secure a cut in lng import prices. the japan trade minister and the deputy chairman of india signed a joint statement in tokyo. japan is the world's largest lng importer. india's gas imports have been increasing in line with its economi
. >> nuclear power seems to be losing its appeal as the technology of the future worldwide, not least after the disaster in fukushima last year. even japan has announced it will phase it out, tremendous success for those who have been fighting against a source of energy they say is simply too risky. but some are still in favor of nuclear power, despite the risks. among them as belarus, one of the worst affected in the aftermath of chernobyl in 1986. yet, alexander lukashenko, known as europe's last dictator, is having a brand-new reactor built in his country. >> the northwest corner of belarus near the lithuanian corner, one of the lucky areas of the country that was not contaminated by the chernobyl nuclear disaster. a peculiar choice of location for the poverty-stricken nation to build its first nuclear power plant. the first buildings sport a quote by victor lukashenko. the technology is russian. moscow's lending belarus nearly 10 billion euros to build this, the first of its kind. according to the government, the majority of belarussians support the project. we've been told to follow th
to provide what japan has developed on disaster prevention, such as know how, technologies, and human resources. through that, we want to contribute to international society. >> reporter: world bank representatives say more money is spent on disaster response and recovery than preparation and prevention. they note the impact of disasters, especially on the poor, is growing. they argue investing in risk management could help reverse this trend, saving lives and money. terui, nhk world, sendai. >>> and we'll take you to the imf world bank gathering here in tokyo a little later in the day. we'll have live updates from the tokyo international forum at 1:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. japan time. that's midnight and 7:00 a.m. in new york. 5:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m. in london. >>> let's take a look at the market figures. >>> japanese businesses have been feeling the impact of a heated political dispute with china. chinese have boycotted their products because japan nationalized a group of islands in the east china sea, but that boycott doesn't appear to be having an impact on at least one popular prod
differentiated into any kind of tissue you want. >> that's pretty exciting technology. what could be the next steps ahead? >> there are medical diagnostics. we need to understand differentiation about how this happens. then eventually, they're going to hope they will be able to grow tissue specifically tailored to individuals. >> exciting years ahead of us in this field. thank you very much for that. >> russia is due to open the second leg of the gas line to europe today. the first by -- pipeline has been pumping gas to germany since november last year. this will double their annual capacity to up to $55 -- 55 billion cubic meteres. gazprom is already looking at other lines. they have already warned about becoming too dependent on russia for energy. >> the first capsule with cargo left for the iss. >> it included ice cream, clothing, and cargo. >> i fancy some ice cream right now. stay with us more. we will have more at the top of the hour. >> see you soon.
of responsibility. ips is a new technology and it has a lot of promise in the field of medicine and the development of new drugs. i want to continue this research. now that i have received this honor, i would like to -- or i feel i must contribute to society as soon as possible. >> professor yamanaka also says he's honored to be awarded the prize aside gerden. >> yamanaka's work was a major breakthrough. primarily because it showed that you could derive embryo cells from adult cells simply by adding the right combination of genes. >> the announcement of the nobel prize in literature is scheduled for this thursday. japan's murakami is one of the writers favored to win the award. >>> delegates from more than 170 nations have gathered in india to talk about biodiversity. the united nations holds the conference every two years. delegates at the 2010 talks graed on rules for sharing economic benefits from genetic resources. the nagoya protocol included ways to safeguard. they set a target of conserving 17% of land and 10% of coastal and marine areas by 2020. but many governments have yet to pass laws en
of responsibility. ips is a new technology, and it has a lot of potential in the field of medicine and the development of new drugs. i want to continue this research. now that i have received this honor, i would like to -- or i feel i must contribute to society as soon as possible. >> professor yamanaka also said he's very honored to receive this coveted prize alongside john b. gurdon. >>> space exploration has entered the commercial era. a ship built by a u.s. company has blasted off with supplies for astronauts in orbit. the craft is taking over from the space shuttles and taking private enterprise where it's never gone before. nhk world's sarah milkovich has the story. >> three, two, one. >> reporter: engineers at the u.s. firm spacex confirmed the unmanned dragon capsule. they launched it from cape canaveral air force station in florida. the rocket separated on schedule ten minutes after liftoff. dragon is cruising towards the space station. it's due to dock in three days 400 kilometers above the earth. it's carrying nearly a ton of food and experimental equipment. spacex is th
technology to treat a patient. he says he performed the world's first transplant of the ips cells. but officials at the university where he claims to have done the work claims he didn't do it there. he described his achievements at an academic meeting in new york on wednesday. they took down a poster about his work. he told nhk he did the transplant in february. he said he performed the procedure at the massachusetts general hospital which is affiliated with harvard university. he said his team treated a man with heart disease. he said they transplanted 27 million muscle cells transformed from ips cells. he claimed he had permission from the patient and university officials. he said he was happy to see the patient walk home as the man hadn't expected to be cured. officials at the university and hospital say he has never applied to conduct clinical research on ips cells there. he says he doesn't belong to either institution. still, he is standing by his claims. he told nhk he did transplant ips cells into a human patient. >> translator: i did all the necessary research to get each
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8